Earlier today I said the best song of the year was "Higher" by SBTRKT and Raury. I was wrong.

Kendrick Lamar's as-yet-titled, rap-jazz edict, which debuted on The Colbert Report last night, is the best song of 2014. It's not even a competition. Powerful, poetic, bare-boned; it's consummate Kendrick.

There's been an abundance of great music this year, too: Jungle, Nicki Minaj, Big K.R.I.T., YG, FKA Twigs, J. Cole, Jessie Ware, MNEK, Tink, Vince Staples, and D'Angelo's 14-year-long project Black Messiah, which arrived heaven-sent on the back of some merciful, Nubian cornrow'd-Jesus.

But this is, by far, is the best song of the year. With two weeks left in 2014, Kendrick's captured the spirit of moment with a sort of furious clarity. It's as much a call to arms as it is a celebration of pride and personhood. "I shall enjoy the fruits of my labor if I get free today," he raps, over and over. Accompanied by Bilal, Anna Wise, Terrace Martin and Thundercat, the song builds to a feverish climax. Kendrick intones:

What the black man say?
Tell em we don't die
Tell em we don't die
Tell em we don't die
We multiply
Tell em we don't die
Tell em we don't die
Tell em we don't die
We multiply
Tell em we don't die
Tell em we don't die
Tell em we don't die
We multiply
Tell em we don't die
Tell em we don't die
Tell em we don't die
We multiply!

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Again and again.